Are Unprofessional Black Hair Salons Ticking You Off?

Let me paint you a picture. For many of you, it is a picture that will look familiar; a picture that describes the humiliation and fury millions of black women feel on a regular basis all across America.
Your hair is in need of professional attention, so you head to your favorite salon. You get there and you take a seat in the waiting area. And you wait. And you wait. And…

Finally, you’re taken to the shampoo bowl, where you wait some more. Eventually, your hair gets washed and conditioned. And you wait—with a wet head. All the while, you listen to inane conversation not fit for public consumption.

You finally are ushered to the dryer, where you sit until the timer goes off. Then you sit and watch client after client go to your stylist’s chair to be serviced. You wonder where you fit in, whether you’ve been bypassed for someone with an appointment after yours.
Now you’re more than just anxious; now you’re angry. Angry and hungry. Just when you’re about to lose it, you get called over to the stylist’s chair. But it’s almost too late. You’re infuriated, disgusted and, above all, disappointed.
By the time you have been styled and stop at the front desk to pay, you’ve been there for six hours.
This is where black hair salons have, for decades, failed black women.


13904772143_f32396e872_kEditor’s Note: The ladies over at the Lipstick Alley forum are involved in a lively topic, the conversation started from of an article that was posted in 2012 but the problem is as big today as ever. "How long will women deal with shoddy service at black hair salons?".

As someone who has had to wait on many women(Mom, sisters, girlfriends, etc,) that were wasting the day away at the salon, I am interested in the answer. There's a saying, "it is what it is...", is that the point of view that has become the norm or should more be expected for your hard-earned dollars.

Why aren't more salons rising up to take advantage of the horrible customer service that runs rampant in the industry? The opportunity is there for the taking. I'm sure the women needing their hair done in under 5-7 hours without attitude would even pay more money for efficient service.

This is most definitely a hot-button subject, at the time of this writing that specific forum thread has hit the 5th page of comments and is still rolling. Please let me know in the comment section if you are still accepting bad service from your hair salon, if so, why? Here are our forum article highlights:

  • These places go about business in this ridiculous way, as if that is the way it should be, as if it is all right, acceptable.
  • But how, when most stylists never worked in a “real” job where they were required to be on time, dress professionally, conduct business in a respectful manner?
  • Women are tired of the hairdresser having an attitude that they are doing the paying customer a favor.

(Go to full article)

The "Touching Black Women's Hair" Phenomenon - Mini-Documentary

A little over a year ago, a group of black women caused quite a stir when they stood in New York City’s Union Square with signs that said, “You can touch my hair.”

Billed as an “interactive public art exhibit,” their event allowed anyone to “explore the tactile fascination with black hair by” touching real-life black hair on real-life black women.


Editor’s Note:
Many black people were outraged at this display, but many were encouraged and uplifted.

Some thought the women subjected themselves to being treated like animals at a petting zoo. Some thought the women were opening lines of communication with people who may not understand ethic differences but aren't bad people because of that.

Look.... We're all human and want to be treated with equal respect. However, I think the main thing here is these beautiful black women are opening themselves up to the world in order to give insight to people who are curious, as well as shed some light on how women in general feel about their hair. As one womantouching natural hair in the video said, some women are more closed off, some are very open, and some feel their hair is an extension of their spirituality or their very being, so that is why it is so closely guarded. I think it's interesting that these women are willing to give this experience to people with absolutely none of black hair. Overall, I feel that without curiosity you can never learn or grow.

But yes, there is a definite line that shouldn't be crossed. Never force your curiosity on someone, especially if you don't know them. I think one of the women in the video was correct in saying that people should make friends first or at least be in a close enough relationship/acquaintance to warrant asking about personal hygiene. Giving compliments, admiring, asking how they get their hair so shiny, those things shouldn't be so taboo though.

At the end of the day, these videos are a nice gateway to not feel so shy or like it's taboo to talk or ask questions about things that we as humans have to deal with on a day-to-day basis like hair care, skin care, fashion, lifestyle etc. Just don't go touching people all random schmandom, you might get hurt that way. Here are our video highlights:

  • Black women feel persecuted for their hair and for good reason.
  • Some people are "honestly ignorant" and those are the people tht can be helped understand the differences in human beings.
  • Hair is an emotional topic of conversation for many women.

Tracee Ellis Ross Proud To See Black Hair On TV

I think what is important about Viola Davis taking her wig off on How to Get Away With Murder is that it illustrates that there is a mask that women are thought to have to wear. For black women, it can be a more complex mask. Our culture has created a very limited view of what beauty is and can be.


Editor’s Note:going natural kinky hairstlyes I've always loved Tracee Ellis Ross and her hair. Being a Detroit boy myself I have a special place in my heart for Motown's own Diana Ross and her daughter. I have to agree with Tracee that it's so good to see natural black hair on TV. Little girls of all races need to see that in mainstream media and know that it's something beautiful. Here are our article highlights:

  • It is important that black girls and women see beautiful images of themselves in the media.
  • Tracee Ellis Ross says she's done playing society's game in order to be considered beautiful.
  • A Black woman’s beauty is far from the European standards of beauty this country follows.

(Go to full article)

Why Wouldn't I Love My Kinky Hair & Dark Skin???

I am a black woman. I have kinky hair. I have full lips. I have very dark skin. I do not have a complex about it. And yet, at every turn, I’ve been made to feel like I should.

I often feel as though people see me and then form a narrative in their heads of my self-esteem -- a girl who grew up longing to be lighter skinned, who cried every night because she didn't look like Beyonce, a girl who had to scratch and fight to get over feeling ugly because she felt her dark complexion wasn't beautiful.


Comment Section Quote Of Note From Duni1:dark skinned black women "Oh thank goodness. I'm in the same boat. I've never thought myself as being or not looking better then someone else of lighter skin or less kinky hair, but you would think I might have a complex if you listen to media.
I like myself and my hair and for some reason it seems to undermine the belief that i must have some sort of color-self-hatred.
I mean I do, but its generally about my weight and the fact that I have no clue how to wear makeup but can do my nails like a pro.
Other people feel odd about my skin color and I'm just like... you know what... you can go ahead and carry that torch for me... I'm going to continue with my life." Here are our article highlights:

  • In Ghana(African continent) there are large billboards that advertise lightening products like Fair & Lovely.
  • There is a kind of validation that comes with seeing people that look like you in the media you consume.
  • The assumption that everyone wants to have straight hair and light skin is false.

(Go to full article)

Are Natural Black Hairstyles Fit For The Navy?

Sims, in her unusual stand, contends that hair regulations are biased against the natural hairstyles of many African-American women, and her career is evidence they are ambiguous at best: She wore her hair in the same style for nine years in the Navy before being ordered to cut it.

She said: "I don't think I should be told that I have to straighten my hair in order to be within what they think the regulations are, and I don't think I should have to cover it up with a wig."

“I do think that it’s a race issue,” Sims said. “The majority of the hairstyles that have the strictest regulations are hairstyles that black women would wear.”

The Navy, however, argued that all dreadlocks are out of regs, and because she has refused to cut them or cover them up, moved to honorably discharge her for “serious misconduct.”


Editor’s Note:jessica sims hair This story isn't a surprise to me, for the longest time natural black hair has been held in contempt. I find it weird that after years and years of wearing her hair in this manner, always neat, clean and within two inches of her head she suddenly is forced to change it or get out. The Navy has since relaxed their standards for women's hair but it's still slanted towards not fully accepting natural black hairstyles. But the story has a happy ending because Jessica aint sweatin' it, she got her discharge papers with her hair on her head and her dignity intact, now she's headed to Loyola University in Chicago where she will major in biology as a pre-med. Do your thang Jessica! Here are our article highlights:

  • Jessica Sims says the Navy's order amounted to shaving off her locks and wearing a wig which she wasn't going to do.
  • Sims says she always made sure that her hair bun didn't protrude more than 2 inches from her head, per Navy regulations.
  • She is happy she took a stand and says she would do it again, she doesn't feel her natural hair is "unprofessional".

(Go to full article)

3 Tips To Help White Men Compliment a Black Woman's Hair

I try to remember that there’s room to think about large-scale, urgent matters of social justice and microaggressions (a term that’s made a recent resurgence to refer to race-related, irksome interactions that add up and alienate people on a daily basis). Truthfully, anything to do with black women and hair runs a pretty high risk of slipping into the latter category.


Editor’s Note:white men like black women Jenée Desmond-Harris delivers a useful answer to a question she received from a white gentleman. The man had given a compliment to a black woman who was rockin' an amazing afro. He wanted to know if he was out of place or not.

Personally, I find it a sad reality that society is so jacked up that we can't compliment someone without worrying if we are offending them, but when society is so laced with racism, prejudice and bias it's not a shock that people are wary of the intentions of comments from strangers who normally are not known to be complimentary towards anything out of the "mainstream" look. I hope that in the future natural women are truly accepted and get so many genuine compliments that it won't be an issue anymore. Here the 3 tips for successful complimenting:

  • Do not touch if you don't KNOW you have permission to touch.
  • Compliment, don’t interrogate.
  • Don't make a scene, regardless of good intentions.

(Go to full article)

One Black Woman's Journey To Embracing Her Natural Self

Going natural was a lengthy and scary notion for me. Once I gained the confidence and the knowledge of the many health benefits to my psyche, skin, and hair — I still put it off.

This is a short journey of how I ditched my chemical relaxer, plus a few tips I discovered so you can go the natural route too.


Editor’s Note:kristin Kristin is a brilliant writer that really makes you feel her journal to getting a beautiful head full of healthy, natural hair. I'm sure many women can relate to the pain and discomfort of getting a perm and Kristin cried and sobbed her way through it until she'd had enough.

It's a profound thought to think that just like Kristin, so many women haven't had healthy hair since childhood, as she says, 6th grade was the last time her hair was healthy(until now).

She got past her fears of thinking she'd end up dateless with short hair and did what she had to do to get her hair and HERSELF back. Here are our article highlights:

  • Kristin compares getting her hair permed to being tortured.
  • She highlights the 3 ways begin your journey to natural hair. The big chop, the relaxer grow out and the weave out.
  • She says it's one of the best things she's ever done, not just for her beauty but to overcome self-doubt.

(Go to full article)

Women's Natural Black Hair 10-Min Mini-Documentary

10-minute mini documentary that discusses the historical context of African-American women that are on television and natural hair. The doc highlights Oprah Winfrey, Melissa Harris-Perry, Rochelle Ritchie, and Rhonda Lee.


Editor’s Note:beautiful dark skinned black woman This was a nice and quick 10-minute documentary with a panel of four professional black women talking about the pressures of needing to constantly worry about how they and their hair are seen in the eyes of Western society.

The panel discusses experiences of prominent black women in the media and Professor Yanela Gordon raises an interesting point when she says that in the United States black women and black hair has been portrayed as the opposite of beauty and that tactic was used in order to create and develop an inferiority complex which was required to enable slavery to work in the first place. Finally, there was a point that I couldn't agree with more, and that was that little black girls need to see black women BE black women in order to feel pride in themselves. Here are our article highlights:

  • The panel of black women talk about how they have tried to fit in with the majority "white" look when interviewing for jobs.
  • A lot of times women don't want to associate with their natural selves because they don't know the history behind it and that it's something to be proud of.
  • According to Melissa Harris-Perry, dreadlocks are "locs" not "dreads" and not something to be dreaded.
  • The panel of women thinks that more and more young girls will embrace their natural hair in the future.

The Advantages & Challenges of Going Natural - Black Hair

We all know that the trend of going natural is increasingly growing but relaxer free is not for everyone.

As a licensed stylist for over 13 years I have seen and heard many stories from clients who have succeeded and failed at this growing trend, so let me give you are few pros and cons of going natural.


Editor’s Note:kinky-weave3From www.s2smagazine.com - As they say, "nothing worth having comes easy". In this short write-up by celebrity stylist Keisha George, she breaks down 3 reasons to go natural and 3 reasons it may be difficult to do so. Her list isn't showing a bias or leaning in either direction, she is just telling you what she has seen in her line of work with black women going natural more and more. Some women get excited about the idea of joining the natural hair movement and then get discouraged at the new challenges they face. It's better to know the good and bad ahead of time and see if going natural works for you and your lifestyle. Here are our article highlights:

      PROS:

    • 1. Better Hair Growth
    • 2. Endless New Styles To Try
    • 3. Color Your Hair With Less Damage
    CONS:

  • 1. Getting Charged More At Salons For Working With Natural Hair
  • 2. Natural Hair Is More Work To Maintain
  • 3. More Fear of Sweating

(Go to full article)

How To Dye Natural Black Hair Without Destroying It

Even though YouTube is a great place to learn how to do hair treatments on your own hair by yourself, that still doesn’t replace experience and a lack of experience in regards to chemically changing the composition of your hair can cause extreme shedding and breakage.


Editor’s Note:dying natural black hairFrom www.howtoblackhair.com - The beautiful Breanna Rutter helps out another woman who needs natural hair care advice, this time concerning dying black natural hair. She is known to give solid advice and her Youtube channel has 200K+ subscribers. I want to see Breanna add a little more personality to her videos, I think that alone will take her success to even greater heights. That aside, her information is always useful and it's great to see a young business woman doing her thaaaang! #SmartChicksRock... Here are some video highlights:

  • She strongly suggest that you use a licensed cosmetologist to color your hair and avoid disaster.
  • You can dye your hair without the assistance of a pro if you choose to use plant dyes like indigo and henna hair dye.
  • Not ready to commit? A non-permanent coloring treatment may be your best choice. You can also use semi-permanent hair colors or rinses to add a glossy color to your hair.

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