Teaching Black Women To Embrace Their Own Hair

Some women, they’ve been wearing chemical hair relaxers for so long, they don’t even know how to do their natural hair.

They don’t know how to comb it,” she said. “They think you comb it from the root all the way down, from the scalp to the ends, but you don’t.

You actually start at the ends and then you work your way back to the scalp. That’s the easiest way to comb your hair.

 


Editor’s Note: This is a story about a woman making a difference in the natural hair community. Luvina Sabree is a very interesting an accomplished woman. She dove into the world of all-natural products after one of her children was diagnosed with eczema.

She made her own naturaNatural Hair Dayl, fragrance-free soaps and bath products and that helped. However, the more she researched eczema, the more she realized that in order to effectively manage the eczema they had to start treating it from the inside out.

Little by little, Sabree cut out all junk and processed foods from her family’s diet and started using only fresh, organic ingredients. The eczema improved and the family noticed an immediate improvement in the way they all felt. At that point, she knew she was on to something. That lead to other discoveries about the danger of chemicals and toxins we use on and in our bodies.

Nearly a decade ago, Sabree started a Natural Hair Group in Killeen that still meets monthly.

“There’s a movement of women who want to go back to their natural hair and stop using straighteners with toxic chemicals linked to cancer. Now I do an Armed Forces Natural Hair & Health Expo Show twice a year, once in Killeen and once in San Antonio”.

Killeen’s Happy 2 B Nappy Hair Group, teaches free classes for black women who want to learn how to take care of and manage their naturally kinky hair. The beautiful thing is that Luvina is able to enlighten so many women who did not understand the very hair growing from their heads, she’s able to fill them with knowledge and confidence of who they really are. I hope more women with knowledge began taking on the role that Luvina has embraced, it is certainly needed. Here are our article highlights:

  • Sometimes the balding caused by perm chemical burns is permanent and irreversible.
  • Luvina has found natural herbs and other remedies to help black women who may have lost or all of their hair because of perming.
  • Black females should be proud of their natural beauty as it will keep them healthy.

(Go to full article)

5 Reasons To Love Black Women With Natural Hair

We exude confidence like no one else. Let me tell you something, do you have any IDEA how much courage and it takes to cut ALL your hair off as a woman?


Editor’s Note: This list of reasons to date a black woman with natural hair is pretty good. Many of these advantages are exactly what men are looking for when dating a woman.Black love natural hair It’s hard enough relating to the opposite sex, but when you feel like it’s a sin to touch her hair or ask her to go to the gym with you, the problems can add up quickly. I’m 100% sure that natural women will have an easier time in relationships. Yes, girls without natural hair can make great wives and mates, but I’m here to say that I’d prefer a natural girl for the reasons listed below. Here are our article highlights:

  • #Teamnatural girls are easy to buy gifts for. Buying natural hair products makes them smile from ear to ear.
  • A man can play with his natural woman’s hair and she won’t try to kill him.
  • You know it’s all real. Basically what you see is what you get, that counts a lot for most men.
  • They are not your average African-American woman when it comes to hair and health, they are freer and more open.
  • They display a sexy self-confidence that can’t be denied.

(Go to full article)

The Work Of Art Known As Natural Black Hair

Beautiful black women are magic and their hair is gorgeous, what this beautiful black art represents is what we should have more of in the public eye to see.

And to think we have been brain-washed by western European standards into believing our hair is not “good”. I would love to see an exhibit on these pieces. I found an amazing thread started on Lipstick Alley back in September of 2014 and it’s still rolling along strong.

These ladies and gents have compiled a collection of stunning images depicting different artist interpretations of natural black hair.


Editor’s Note: The brilliantly colorful and sometimes even chilling pieces of art should really be seen by anyone who is a fan of natural hair. I hope you can check out these works of art, I promise you that you will be trying to find where you can buy some of these stunning pieces. And if you find out, you be sure to let me know. #teamnatural

teamnatural going natural black hairnatural black hair - kinky curlynatural black womanbig chop - natural hairnatural black hairblack women going natural hairAfter a natural hair big chopMore black women going with natural hair

(Go to full article)




Hair Butter Review For Type 4b Hair Styles

I used this product to set my hair in twists, flat twists and braids on many occasions.

I thoroughly massaged my ends with this product to keep them from getting dry.

I used the entire jar up in under a month and was very upset that I had no more.

 


4b type hair butterEditor’s Note: Jenell Stewart from kinkycurlyme.com gives a helpful review as she always does, this time she reviewed a product that works very well for type 4b hair.

The natural hair care product is called Pura Body Naturals Cupuacu Hair, she tried the Tahitian Vanilla scent and the cost was $14 for 4 ounces. She does a good job of breaking down the pros and cons. Here are our article highlights:

  • Jenell felt that the price for only 4 ounces of hair butter was a bit high at $14.
  • Jenell has kinky curly coily type 4b hair, after using the hair butter her ends felt great and her twist out had great definition too.
  • The hair butter has a great Tahitian vanilla scent.

(Go to full article)

Abena Appiah Taking Natural Black Hair To The Miss Universe Stage!

By and large, people assume that a Black woman wearing her natural hair is making some sort of political statement, which is why I predict that depending on how far she advances in the competition, Abena Appiah’s coiffure will illicit no small buzz once the event is televised.

We shall see!

 


Editor’s Note: Abena Appiah's natural hairFrom www.mindofmalaka.com -When the 63rd Miss Universe Pageant comes around in a couple of weeks(Jan 25, Sunday), we will see something that has never been seen before in a beauty contest of this magnitude.

The beautiful Abena Appiah will be the first Ghanaian woman to compete while wearing her hair naturally.

In the past, it was the norm forn black beauty contestants to rock straight hair in order to fit in, well Abena will stand out from the crowd. There’s no doubt that Abena Appiah’s hair will be a central focus of attention and that’s a good thing.

Why? Because she’s showing women with her hair that they are also “universally” beautiful as their natural selves. I’ll be tuned in. Here are our article highlights:

  • The standard of beauty in Western culture is overwhelmingly Eurocentric, which makes her decision very notable.
  • We are approaching a point where natural hair is becoming more mainstream than ever.
  • Although it’s important, Abena Appiah is more than just her hair, she’s an excelling and intelligent academic student, as well as talented musician.

(Go to full article)

Black Hair & The Twisted Politics Behind It – Video

This was a truly profound and REAL conversation about the way Western and American culture views and treats beauty that sits outside of it’s typical standards.

Actress Nicole Ari Parker of Broadway’s Streetcar Named Desire, University of Pennsylvania professor Anthea Butler, cultural critic Joan Morgan, and CurlyNikki.com founder Nikki Walton, sit down with Melissa Harris-Perry to talk about the political messages behind black hair and hairstyles.

 


Editor’s Note: This set of videos is a classic throwback journalistic piece, in case you haven’t seen it they talk about how more women have turned towards going natural since 2007 and are changing the economy of black hair.

The ladies really lay it out on the line in this heartfelt conversation, they speak very honestlpolitics of black hairy about their feelings, how having children changed their perspective on their own hair and how America’s view on black hair impacts the psyche of black women in their own self-perception.

They talk about the importance of telling little black girls how beautiful their hair is when doing their hair instead of saying derogatory remarks, like “you look a mess”, “you ain’t going outside looking like that” and “let’s work on that kitchen”. Here are our video highlights:

  • It’s amazing that it’s considered “revolutionary” to wear your hair the way it grows out of your head.
  • They talk about worrying about if black men will find them attractive, will employers want to hire them.
  • Black women have literally been dying of poor health because they don’t want to workout and mess up their hair.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Teacher Changes Student’s Unkempt Hair & Posts Pics To Facebook

Would you feel,”some kinda way” if your daughter’s teacher took it upon herself to change your child’s hair because her hair appeared unkempt?

What about if she posted before and after pics to her Facebook account?

There’s a picture (to the left, to the left…) going around the social media world right now of a young black girl who had her hair done (quite beautifully, I might add…) by her teacher in class because her hair had lint in it and it looked a bit uncared for.

It seems that the child’s teacher had her heart in the right place, she wanted the little girl to look good and feel good about herself.

She decided she would give the little girl a new “do” and brighten up her day. But if she had permission to do so or not is not very clear. And if she did have permission to do it, did she also have permission to post pics of the child on social media?

I’d think that would be more than a little bit embarrassing for the parents, even if they were happy about the hair help. Check out the Facebook post below.

teacher does childs natural hair facebook

teacher does black childs natural hair at school facebookI have serious doubts that the little girl’s parent would take kindly to the description of her hair when she entered class, even if the description was somewhat accurate. She writes:

So one of my students came to school today with he hair full of knots, lent [sic], and ridiculously tangled. It looked like it hand’t been touched the entire holiday break…so my classroom became a salon. The photo on the left is before and the right after . It just broke my heart so badly that I refused to let her leave school today the same way she came. When I finished she looked at herself and said “aww so pretty”…the beauty is that she is normally non-verbal. So now I’m crying lol. My day has been made!

Do you think this teacher was out-of-line or just being a good-hearted helper to the child that couldn’t resist doing something nice?

I personally think she did a nice thing out of kindness when she did the girls hair, BUT, if she didn’t have permission she still was out-of-line. Even so, it was nice for the little girl, and probably very embarrassing to the parents.

Especially after it went viral on the net. At least the teacher didn’t show the girl’s face though.

In the end, the teacher should not be villianized for her actions, but she may want to be more conscious of her boundaries with other people’s children. And maybe the girl’s parents will be more conscious of getting the lint out of that baby’s hair before she goes into public.

——

UPDATE! 11:45 AM 1/11/2015

Although we still have not heard anything from the parents, one woman is claiming to know the teacher and be a part of her Facebook group. She claims that the teacher had permission to do the girl’s hair as well as post pics of it online. This is just one woman’s claim, so take it for what it’s worth.

teacher-special needs

What do you think about this situation? Comment below.

Are Unprofessional Black Hair Salons Ticking You Off?

Let me paint you a picture. For many of you, it is a picture that will look familiar; a picture that describes the humiliation and fury millions of black women feel on a regular basis all across America.
Your hair is in need of professional attention, so you head to your favorite salon. You get there and you take a seat in the waiting area. And you wait. And you wait. And…

Finally, you’re taken to the shampoo bowl, where you wait some more. Eventually, your hair gets washed and conditioned. And you wait—with a wet head. All the while, you listen to inane conversation not fit for public consumption.

You finally are ushered to the dryer, where you sit until the timer goes off. Then you sit and watch client after client go to your stylist’s chair to be serviced. You wonder where you fit in, whether you’ve been bypassed for someone with an appointment after yours.
Now you’re more than just anxious; now you’re angry. Angry and hungry. Just when you’re about to lose it, you get called over to the stylist’s chair. But it’s almost too late. You’re infuriated, disgusted and, above all, disappointed.
By the time you have been styled and stop at the front desk to pay, you’ve been there for six hours.
This is where black hair salons have, for decades, failed black women.


13904772143_f32396e872_kEditor’s Note: The ladies over at the Lipstick Alley forum are involved in a lively topic, the conversation started from of an article that was posted in 2012 but the problem is as big today as ever. “How long will women deal with shoddy service at black hair salons?”.

As someone who has had to wait on many women(Mom, sisters, girlfriends, etc,) that were wasting the day away at the salon, I am interested in the answer. There’s a saying, “it is what it is…”, is that the point of view that has become the norm or should more be expected for your hard-earned dollars.

Why aren’t more salons rising up to take advantage of the horrible customer service that runs rampant in the industry? The opportunity is there for the taking. I’m sure the women needing their hair done in under 5-7 hours without attitude would even pay more money for efficient service.

This is most definitely a hot-button subject, at the time of this writing that specific forum thread has hit the 5th page of comments and is still rolling. Please let me know in the comment section if you are still accepting bad service from your hair salon, if so, why? Here are our forum article highlights:

  • These places go about business in this ridiculous way, as if that is the way it should be, as if it is all right, acceptable.
  • But how, when most stylists never worked in a “real” job where they were required to be on time, dress professionally, conduct business in a respectful manner?
  • Women are tired of the hairdresser having an attitude that they are doing the paying customer a favor.

(Go to full article)

The “Touching Black Women’s Hair” Phenomenon – Mini-Documentary

A little over a year ago, a group of black women caused quite a stir when they stood in New York City’s Union Square with signs that said, “You can touch my hair.”

Billed as an “interactive public art exhibit,” their event allowed anyone to “explore the tactile fascination with black hair by” touching real-life black hair on real-life black women.


Editor’s Note:
Many black people were outraged at this display, but many were encouraged and uplifted.

Some thought the women subjected themselves to being treated like animals at a petting zoo. Some thought the women were opening lines of communication with people who may not understand ethic differences but aren’t bad people because of that.

Look…. We’re all human and want to be treated with equal respect. However, I think the main thing here is these beautiful black women are opening themselves up to the world in order to give insight to people who are curious, as well as shed some light on how women in general feel about their hair. As one womantouching natural hair in the video said, some women are more closed off, some are very open, and some feel their hair is an extension of their spirituality or their very being, so that is why it is so closely guarded. I think it’s interesting that these women are willing to give this experience to people with absolutely none of black hair. Overall, I feel that without curiosity you can never learn or grow.

But yes, there is a definite line that shouldn’t be crossed. Never force your curiosity on someone, especially if you don’t know them. I think one of the women in the video was correct in saying that people should make friends first or at least be in a close enough relationship/acquaintance to warrant asking about personal hygiene. Giving compliments, admiring, asking how they get their hair so shiny, those things shouldn’t be so taboo though.

At the end of the day, these videos are a nice gateway to not feel so shy or like it’s taboo to talk or ask questions about things that we as humans have to deal with on a day-to-day basis like hair care, skin care, fashion, lifestyle etc. Just don’t go touching people all random schmandom, you might get hurt that way. Here are our video highlights:

  • Black women feel persecuted for their hair and for good reason.
  • Some people are “honestly ignorant” and those are the people tht can be helped understand the differences in human beings.
  • Hair is an emotional topic of conversation for many women.

Tracee Ellis Ross Proud To See Black Hair On TV

I think what is important about Viola Davis taking her wig off on How to Get Away With Murder is that it illustrates that there is a mask that women are thought to have to wear. For black women, it can be a more complex mask. Our culture has created a very limited view of what beauty is and can be.


Editor’s Note:going natural kinky hairstlyes I’ve always loved Tracee Ellis Ross and her hair. Being a Detroit boy myself I have a special place in my heart for Motown’s own Diana Ross and her daughter. I have to agree with Tracee that it’s so good to see natural black hair on TV. Little girls of all races need to see that in mainstream media and know that it’s something beautiful. Here are our article highlights:

  • It is important that black girls and women see beautiful images of themselves in the media.
  • Tracee Ellis Ross says she’s done playing society’s game in order to be considered beautiful.
  • A Black woman’s beauty is far from the European standards of beauty this country follows.

(Go to full article)