What Exactly Is Hair Porosity? And How To Manage It...

hair porosity
Porosity is defined as your hair’s ability to absorb water or other chemicals into the shaft of the hair. All hair is porous but your level of porosity will vary based on genetics and the amount of damage that the cuticle layer has been subjected to. Processes such as coloring the hair, heat styling or relaxing are examples that can affect increase the porosity of hair. Also, daily maintenance such as detangling and shampooing can sometimes affect the cuticle layer.

Porosity is usually measured as being low, medium or high. Highly porous hair absorbs a lot of water, but it also means it released moisture fast, meaning it is harder to keep highly porous hair moisturized! Low porous hair will hold on to moisture longer, but it is more difficult for the hair to pull in the water.


Lee's Video Highlights:

  • You cannot change the level of porosity you were born with but you can change how large the cuticles on your hair shaft enlarge by limiting the manipulation of your hair in its entirety.
  • If you have high porous hair it's suggested to occasionally try an apple cider vinegar rinse in order to lower the pH of hair which will help to close cuticles tighter and trap moisture in
  • If you have hair with low porosity that is resistant to moisture you can help infuse moisture into your hair by incorporating a hair steamer into your hair care regimen.
  • Another cool tip for low porosity hair is to soak your hair in natural alkaline water for a few minutes just to slightly increase the pH of it, this helps open the cuticle more and infuses more moisture into the hair strands.

Abena Appiah Taking Natural Black Hair To The Miss Universe Stage!

By and large, people assume that a Black woman wearing her natural hair is making some sort of political statement, which is why I predict that depending on how far she advances in the competition, Abena Appiah’s coiffure will illicit no small buzz once the event is televised.

We shall see!

 


Editor’s Note: Abena Appiah's natural hairFrom www.mindofmalaka.com -When the 63rd Miss Universe Pageant comes around in a couple of weeks(Jan 25, Sunday), we will see something that has never been seen before in a beauty contest of this magnitude.

The beautiful Abena Appiah will be the first Ghanaian woman to compete while wearing her hair naturally.

In the past, it was the norm forn black beauty contestants to rock straight hair in order to fit in, well Abena will stand out from the crowd. There's no doubt that Abena Appiah’s hair will be a central focus of attention and that's a good thing.

Why? Because she's showing women with her hair that they are also "universally" beautiful as their natural selves. I'll be tuned in. Here are our article highlights:

  • The standard of beauty in Western culture is overwhelmingly Eurocentric, which makes her decision very notable.
  • We are approaching a point where natural hair is becoming more mainstream than ever.
  • Although it's important, Abena Appiah is more than just her hair, she's an excelling and intelligent academic student, as well as talented musician.

(Go to full article)

Black Hair & The Twisted Politics Behind It - Video

This was a truly profound and REAL conversation about the way Western and American culture views and treats beauty that sits outside of it's typical standards.

Actress Nicole Ari Parker of Broadway's Streetcar Named Desire, University of Pennsylvania professor Anthea Butler, cultural critic Joan Morgan, and CurlyNikki.com founder Nikki Walton, sit down with Melissa Harris-Perry to talk about the political messages behind black hair and hairstyles.

 


Editor’s Note: This set of videos is a classic throwback journalistic piece, in case you haven't seen it they talk about how more women have turned towards going natural since 2007 and are changing the economy of black hair.

The ladies really lay it out on the line in this heartfelt conversation, they speak very honestlpolitics of black hairy about their feelings, how having children changed their perspective on their own hair and how America's view on black hair impacts the psyche of black women in their own self-perception.

They talk about the importance of telling little black girls how beautiful their hair is when doing their hair instead of saying derogatory remarks, like "you look a mess", "you ain't going outside looking like that" and "let's work on that kitchen". Here are our video highlights:

  • It's amazing that it's considered "revolutionary" to wear your hair the way it grows out of your head.
  • They talk about worrying about if black men will find them attractive, will employers want to hire them.
  • Black women have literally been dying of poor health because they don't want to workout and mess up their hair.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

The "Touching Black Women's Hair" Phenomenon - Mini-Documentary

A little over a year ago, a group of black women caused quite a stir when they stood in New York City’s Union Square with signs that said, “You can touch my hair.”

Billed as an “interactive public art exhibit,” their event allowed anyone to “explore the tactile fascination with black hair by” touching real-life black hair on real-life black women.


Editor’s Note:
Many black people were outraged at this display, but many were encouraged and uplifted.

Some thought the women subjected themselves to being treated like animals at a petting zoo. Some thought the women were opening lines of communication with people who may not understand ethic differences but aren't bad people because of that.

Look.... We're all human and want to be treated with equal respect. However, I think the main thing here is these beautiful black women are opening themselves up to the world in order to give insight to people who are curious, as well as shed some light on how women in general feel about their hair. As one womantouching natural hair in the video said, some women are more closed off, some are very open, and some feel their hair is an extension of their spirituality or their very being, so that is why it is so closely guarded. I think it's interesting that these women are willing to give this experience to people with absolutely none of black hair. Overall, I feel that without curiosity you can never learn or grow.

But yes, there is a definite line that shouldn't be crossed. Never force your curiosity on someone, especially if you don't know them. I think one of the women in the video was correct in saying that people should make friends first or at least be in a close enough relationship/acquaintance to warrant asking about personal hygiene. Giving compliments, admiring, asking how they get their hair so shiny, those things shouldn't be so taboo though.

At the end of the day, these videos are a nice gateway to not feel so shy or like it's taboo to talk or ask questions about things that we as humans have to deal with on a day-to-day basis like hair care, skin care, fashion, lifestyle etc. Just don't go touching people all random schmandom, you might get hurt that way. Here are our video highlights:

  • Black women feel persecuted for their hair and for good reason.
  • Some people are "honestly ignorant" and those are the people tht can be helped understand the differences in human beings.
  • Hair is an emotional topic of conversation for many women.

Are Natural Black Hairstyles Fit For The Navy?

Sims, in her unusual stand, contends that hair regulations are biased against the natural hairstyles of many African-American women, and her career is evidence they are ambiguous at best: She wore her hair in the same style for nine years in the Navy before being ordered to cut it.

She said: "I don't think I should be told that I have to straighten my hair in order to be within what they think the regulations are, and I don't think I should have to cover it up with a wig."

“I do think that it’s a race issue,” Sims said. “The majority of the hairstyles that have the strictest regulations are hairstyles that black women would wear.”

The Navy, however, argued that all dreadlocks are out of regs, and because she has refused to cut them or cover them up, moved to honorably discharge her for “serious misconduct.”


Editor’s Note:jessica sims hair This story isn't a surprise to me, for the longest time natural black hair has been held in contempt. I find it weird that after years and years of wearing her hair in this manner, always neat, clean and within two inches of her head she suddenly is forced to change it or get out. The Navy has since relaxed their standards for women's hair but it's still slanted towards not fully accepting natural black hairstyles. But the story has a happy ending because Jessica aint sweatin' it, she got her discharge papers with her hair on her head and her dignity intact, now she's headed to Loyola University in Chicago where she will major in biology as a pre-med. Do your thang Jessica! Here are our article highlights:

  • Jessica Sims says the Navy's order amounted to shaving off her locks and wearing a wig which she wasn't going to do.
  • Sims says she always made sure that her hair bun didn't protrude more than 2 inches from her head, per Navy regulations.
  • She is happy she took a stand and says she would do it again, she doesn't feel her natural hair is "unprofessional".

(Go to full article)

Women's Natural Black Hair 10-Min Mini-Documentary

10-minute mini documentary that discusses the historical context of African-American women that are on television and natural hair. The doc highlights Oprah Winfrey, Melissa Harris-Perry, Rochelle Ritchie, and Rhonda Lee.


Editor’s Note:beautiful dark skinned black woman This was a nice and quick 10-minute documentary with a panel of four professional black women talking about the pressures of needing to constantly worry about how they and their hair are seen in the eyes of Western society.

The panel discusses experiences of prominent black women in the media and Professor Yanela Gordon raises an interesting point when she says that in the United States black women and black hair has been portrayed as the opposite of beauty and that tactic was used in order to create and develop an inferiority complex which was required to enable slavery to work in the first place. Finally, there was a point that I couldn't agree with more, and that was that little black girls need to see black women BE black women in order to feel pride in themselves. Here are our article highlights:

  • The panel of black women talk about how they have tried to fit in with the majority "white" look when interviewing for jobs.
  • A lot of times women don't want to associate with their natural selves because they don't know the history behind it and that it's something to be proud of.
  • According to Melissa Harris-Perry, dreadlocks are "locs" not "dreads" and not something to be dreaded.
  • The panel of women thinks that more and more young girls will embrace their natural hair in the future.