Women's Natural Black Hair 10-Min Mini-Documentary

10-minute mini documentary that discusses the historical context of African-American women that are on television and natural hair. The doc highlights Oprah Winfrey, Melissa Harris-Perry, Rochelle Ritchie, and Rhonda Lee.


Editor’s Note:beautiful dark skinned black woman This was a nice and quick 10-minute documentary with a panel of four professional black women talking about the pressures of needing to constantly worry about how they and their hair are seen in the eyes of Western society.

The panel discusses experiences of prominent black women in the media and Professor Yanela Gordon raises an interesting point when she says that in the United States black women and black hair has been portrayed as the opposite of beauty and that tactic was used in order to create and develop an inferiority complex which was required to enable slavery to work in the first place. Finally, there was a point that I couldn't agree with more, and that was that little black girls need to see black women BE black women in order to feel pride in themselves. Here are our article highlights:

  • The panel of black women talk about how they have tried to fit in with the majority "white" look when interviewing for jobs.
  • A lot of times women don't want to associate with their natural selves because they don't know the history behind it and that it's something to be proud of.
  • According to Melissa Harris-Perry, dreadlocks are "locs" not "dreads" and not something to be dreaded.
  • The panel of women thinks that more and more young girls will embrace their natural hair in the future.

Teaching Little Black Girls To Show Their Hair Love & Care

On wash day, you can give her a small section of her hair (in the front so that she can see in the mirror) to help wash and detangle. This is a great way to teach her the basics of how to do it. As she grows older, you can add more hair for her to do. Eventually, she'll be able to do her whole head!


Editor’s Note: black girl hair
Shaunic Jay writes on one of the most important aspects of having the next generation of black women love their own hair, that's teaching young girls to care for their natural hair. Note, I didn't say cover up their natural hair or chemically change their hair, but CARE for it. It's critically important that these little girls understand that their hair is a gift from God and that they can keep it beautiful, healthy and growing with some tender, loving care. Here are some article highlights:

  • Start early teaching her what to do at bath and bed time.
  • As early as 5 or 6, you can start teaching her to moisturize her hair depending on the thickness and/length of her hair.
  • Let her help wash and detangle her hair on wash day.

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